Posts tagged ‘history’

December 15, 2015

new kid on the block

This was an incredible surprise:

iTunes Best of 2015

Being part of Radiotopia and making the Allusionist this year has been my best ever job anyway, but it was a real thrill for iTunes to pick it out thus. And Answer Me This as a classic! Classic like a car; classic like a 48-volume set of Sir Walter Scott’s novels…

I haven’t really sent Christmas cards for ten years or thereabouts, and accordingly, I now receive very few cards myself. The latest episode of the Allusionist will ensure that dwindles to nought. Though hearing Horrible Histories historian Greg Jenner describe Victorian Christmas cards (bacon! Killer wasps! Death!), I’m half inclined to get back in.

The episode is at theallusionist.org/christmas, and Greg also talks about why Father Christmas is called Santa Claus. Such a shame he narrowly missed being Captain Christmas…

PS This is your annual reminder to buy the Answer Me This! Christmas, if you crave an hour long special about different festive practices and problems. Helps drown out the sound of the traditional festive family argument.

PPS I know that people talking about sleep and dreams is pretty boring, but I tried to make it as interesting as I could in this interview with Van Winkle’s. Anyone know a cure for hypnopompic hallucinations? Please??

PPPS All the Radiotopians chose their favourite episodes they’ve made this year. Christmas party playlist!

July 31, 2015

Spoken and speaking

One of the things that keeps me awake at night (aside from car alarms, waking hallucinations, and my neighbour laughing REALLY loudly) are thoughts like, “Where does THIS word come from?” I’ll try to look it up without waking my husband; and usually the etymology will turn out to be not particularly surprising or interesting. But if it is…that’s a sleepless night, and, if I’m lucky, an episode of the Allusionist.

That’s how it was with ‘step-‘. I thought it would be a fairly straightforward term – but, as I learnt in the new episode, it is neither straightforward etymologically nor emotionally. Aaron Mahnke from Lore Podcast brings the history.

You can hear the episode at theallusionist.org/step. AND I’d love it if you’d join me for a live chat about the episode on Tuesday 4th August, 8pm UK time, on Spoken – it’s a new platform for podcast listeners to gather and discuss shows, and this is the first time I’ll have done this kind of thing, so we’re all just seeing whether/how it works! Go to spoken.am to request an invitation, then prepare your typing-fingers for some chatting next Tuesday. But if you can’t make it, you can drop by to catch up later.

Another common process that results in an Allusionist instalment is me thinking, “Ooh, I’d love to find out more about someone’s job.” That’s how the previous episode came about: cognitive behavioural therapist Dr Jane Gregory describes how she goes about defusing words that are ruining patients’ lives. It’s a fascinating insight. Our brains really do a number on us. theallusionist.org/behave

Aaand finally: yesterday I was on The Spot on San Francisco public radio station KALW, talking about the Latin Lives! episode with charming Latin fan Ashleyanne Krigbaum. Hear here.

January 14, 2015

The Allusionist begins

Boggle logo yes

I am very excited to tell you that my new Radiotopia show The Allusionist – which many of you very generously Kickstarted last autumn – has landed!

It’s all about language – little documentaries about words and phrases, with etymological tidbits thrown in. Its online home is theallusionist.org, and the show is available via iTunes, SoundCloud, RSS and various other podcast-wranglers.

Upon hearing I was doing a show about language, loads of people asked me, “Will there be episodes about puns?” Well, guess what: the very first episode is about puns, so I could get the damn things out of the way. It features my punfortunate brother Andy (familiar to you Bugle fans), and the puntriarch himself, our father Zack. TAKE COVER.

I wanted to launch the show with a double bill, and the second episode is all about bras: blogger Lori Smith teaches me about the history of undergarments, while I wonder why we have so many synonyms for our knickers, but none for bras.


A couple of weeks ago I was chatting with the Radiotopian overlord Roman Mars, and he asked me how it was different starting a new podcast now to when Answer Me This! began eight years ago.

Here’s something which is the same: I don’t know exactly what my show is or how to make it, but I can only learn those things by making it and putting it out. One of the most important pieces of advice I give to people starting a podcast is not to publicise it for at least three months or ten episodes, whichever equals more episodes. They never believe me. But I insist that it’s a good move, because a show always improves, and finds its footing; and it’s not a problem, because when listeners do find it a little later, they are happy to find a backlog of episodes to binge on. Between you and me, I was hoping to follow this advice myself this time. BUT…

Here’s a difference: this time, people are listening. You can’t keep a Radiotopia production under the radar. And there was this very flattering review in the Allusionist’s debut week. Of course it is extraordinary to have listeners right from the start, but, given my statement in the paragraph above, it is also VERY DAUNTING. I was insomniac and crapping myself* for weeks before launching The Allusionist! When we launched AMT, I was totally gung ho: I had no idea what I was getting myself into, nor any relevant experience; and luckily our handful of listeners in the early days were very forgiving of these scrappy upstarts. Now, however, I have spent thousands of hours podcasting, so people expect me not to produce a sloppy bowl of shit soup. While I don’t think the first episodes are sloppy bowls of shit soup, I’ve never presented or produced anything like The Allusionist before – it’s a very different beast to AMT, or Sound Women, or live radio – and I know it will take me a few months to get to grips with it properly. So you’re very welcome to listen to the show now, but you’re also welcome to go away and come back in, say, September, when it is likely to be a fully realised audio masterpiece (or a tidy bowl of shit soup, at least).

Here’s another difference: I am now a full-time podcaster, and it is the best job I have ever had. Long may it continue!

*Not literally, thanks for your concern.

September 22, 2014

No Such Thing As A Fish noises

I have seen into the minds of the QI Elves, and they are, as you might imagine, Chock Full Of Knowledge.

This is quite soul-destroying for me, as I too make a fact-flinging show, and my brain is but a rotten walnut. Seriously! I think I cover it quite well, but almost all the time, my head feels whistlingly empty, a very similar sensation to when you’ve moved all your stuff out of your house and you’re taking one final tour around before locking the front door for the last time.

Nonetheless, I had a great time with the QI Elves on their terrific podcast No Such Thing As A Fish, even though they have Google plumbed straight into their intellects and I do not (hello, inferiority complex). Listen below, or via qi.com/podcast.

By the way – if you’re ever seeking podcast recommendations, on every alternate Thursday (ie the ones when we don’t post a new episode of Answer Me This!) I do a ‘Thursday Listening Party’ post on the AMT site mentioning shows that I’ve particularly enjoyed hearing over that fortnight.

Here they all are, if you want to see, and/or suggest shows that I and the AMT readers should hear. I love finding out about more podcasts, and word of mouth seems to be the best way. So please do enlighten me!