Posts tagged ‘radio’

August 28, 2015

Truth Be Told

One of my favourite podcast genres is the ‘people telling true stories about their lives’ genre. Is there a pithier term for it? Anyway, imagine my joy when I got to host a PTTSATL show! Truth be Told just went out on BBC Radio 4, and is available online here.

I bear scars from this show. Not emotional ones – the mic stand took a chunk out of my hand so I spent the second half of the recording bleeding into a little pile of papers on which audience members had written their heartfelt personal stories.

I managed not to spill any blood when I appeared on Passion Pods. More surprisingly, I also managed to hold the tears in, even though I was talking about my slippery mess of a career. Though the twelve rough years all seem worth it now I get to make The Allusionist! Here are the latest couple of episodes:

In Word Play, I found out the ingredients of fun word games from games inventor Leslie Scott of Oxford Games, who came up with Ex Libris, Flummoxed and JENGA. She’s an absolute delight. There’s more about the episode and links to hear it at theallusionist.org/word-play.

The latest episode is a jaunty trip through 18th century grammatical history, and the almighty battle of language preservation vs language evolution. Which side are you on? theallusionist.org/fix-i

May 30, 2015

News Quiz

Finally, a job my mum can tell her friends about: I was on Radio 4’s News Quiz yesterday! With Jeremy Hardy, Rebecca Front, Francis Wheen and of course presided over by the almighty Sandi Toksvig. The episode is here, or available on the Friday Night Comedy podcast feed.

Here we are on stage at the Radio Theatre, looking studious while Sandi gives Jeremy Hardy an antihistamine.

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May 22, 2015

brunchtime

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In the new Allusionist episode, I teamed up with Dan Pashman from The Sporkful, one of my favourite podcasts, to consider the semantics of brunch. He also taught me a breakfast-architecture technique known as ‘the porklift’. Find out more about the episode at theallusionist.org/brunch, and you can hear more of my conversation with Dan on this recent Sporkful episode. My capacity for pedantry pales in comparison to Dan’s! Must. Try. Harder.

I was on this episode of a new Radio 4 comedy panel show, Best Behaviour, with Holly Walsh, Richard Herring and Lloyd Langford. It’s all about manners, which I wouldn’t say were my strong point, but my mum listened and approved, so PHEW.

I’m also on this recent episode of International Waters with Dave Holmes, Arnab Chanda, Paul Provenza and Brigid Ryan. We recorded very soon after the general election, so you may feel Arnab and I were slightly forlorn in our defence of the UK. On the subject of Maximum Fun – I’ll be attending my first MaxFunCon this year, so if you’re going to be there too, please come and say hello! And sign up for one of my group therapy sessions if you fancy airing any of your problems and questions.

Finally: listen out for me on the News Quiz on Radio 4 next Friday at 6.30pm!

April 6, 2015

krappy krafting: kimono

Today, I had the ridiculous joy of appearing on Woman’s Hour‘s craft special. They asked me to teach Jane Garvey how to sew something on air; as the shops are presently full of diaphanous kimono-style bed-jackety garments, I decided we’d make our own, using three vintage square scarves from my ever-expanding collection (a few months ago I did try to count them, but stopped at 70).

I worship Jane Garvey, but ‘interest in craft’ is not one of her strong points. Watching her wield huge scissors and adopt the unconventional ‘Look, no hands!’ approach to machine sewing, I felt like a novice lion tamer on my first job.

Click here to hear the programme, and click the photo below to zoom in on the tutorial for making one of these very simple garments. I promise they are a lot more straightforward than we made them sound.

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Here’s one I made earlier, flapping about in a high wind. There are French horns on the front, medieval men on horseback on the sleeves, and a massive striped Z on the back.

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November 12, 2014

SWP19: Charlotte Green

For this month’s Sound Women podcast, I spoke to the marvellous Charlotte Green. Now host of the Culture Club on Classic FM, you’ll know her voice from the Shipping Forecast, the football results, the Today Programme, or the tannoy system in heaven.

October 6, 2014

feel the fear and freelance anyway

This month’s Sound Women podcast is all about a subject close to my heart: freelancing! Come next January, I’ll have been a freelancer for ten years. I either think being a freelancer is the best thing in the world, or a terrifyingly irresponsible decision, disastrous for one’s finances and future security. I swing from one to the other several times daily. Joining me to share tales of joy, fear and being an official Mrs Potato Head were the excellent freelancers Matt Hill, Ellie Davis and Nicky Patrick. Listen here or right here:

After having said it a few thousand times, it occurred to me that ‘freelance’ is quite an odd term, so I looked it up and learnt that it was probably coined by Walter Scott in Ivanhoe. There’s your fact of the day.

In other work news, this Saturday was the final episode of BBC 5 Live’s Saturday Edition, a show I’ve been on nearly every week since the very beginning, four years ago. I’m sad to see it go, especially when I heard the montage at the end – you can hear it on the podcast here.

So now I’m patrolling central London wearing an A-board, advertising my services. That’s the best way to get new radio gigs, right?

I’m not sure the best way to stay in the radio industry’s good books was to do this talk at the Next Radio conference last month, but whatevs, it’s too late now:

If you want to hear me banging on about podcasting, then direct yourself to the 25th September edition of the Media Focus podcast; and/or if you would like to read me banging on about podcasting then check out this interview I did with Podcaster News.

And finally: there’s an excellent new online magazine in town, Standard Issue, and I’m delighted to contribute to it. Here I am debunking some stats about women in comedy, that subject that will hopefully one day be known as ‘people in comedy’.

September 12, 2014

The Media Podcast

Popped up on this week’s Media Podcast and whoops, for the second time this week I had a rant about the radio industry. Among other current media topics. Listen here:

September 3, 2014

Sound Women Podcast: NEWS

I love the latest Sound Women podcast, which this month is news-themed. There’s a despatch from Sky News Radio about how they make almost all commercial radio’s hourly news bulletins; podcast regular Ruth Barnes met Jo Carr, who edits Radio 4’s PM, Broadcasting House and iPM; and I spoke to the formidable Petrie Hosken, who doesn’t get phased by much on air at LBC seeing as she used to report from warzones. When you’ve dealt with the threat of being kidnapped on your way to work, you’re pretty much unflappable.

If you’re keen to learn how to podcast, you can still get a ticket for the Guardian podcasting masterclass on 20th September, in which Bugle producer Chris Skinner, Guardian podcast producer Jason Phipps, software developer Drew White, Radio 4’s Film Programme producer Craig Templeton Smith and I will teach you everything we know about the medium. Book tickets HERE.

June 5, 2014

Deserts and Waters

On this month’s Sound Women podcast: it’s only the magnificent Fi Glover! One of my favourite ladies of radio. She talks of the virtues of BLOODY HARD WORK, going for it when you’re young enough to bounce back, and Fanny Trollope. The show is available on iTunes and SoundCloud; make me happy and listen to it:

Dan Tetsell and I joined forces to take on the might of the USA in International Waters. UK-US relations were redefined for the ages.

I’m also on the new episode of Desert Isolation Discs. It’s a bit – ok a lot – like Desert Island Discs, and as it’s the closest I’m likely to get to being on Desert Island Discs, I took the process VERY seriously. http://shadowplayboys.podbean.com/

And finally, in today’s audiodump: my friend Leila Johnston from Shift Run Stop has started a Hack Circus podcast, for which she and I (and her dog, whom you might be able to hear trying to pull the table over) met up in a pub and had a big old chat. It’s on iTunes or not-iTunes. Or right here:

The rest is silence.

May 9, 2014

podcasters on podcasting

It was an absolute joy interviewing so many great podcasters for Olly’s and my BBC Radio 4 documentary Podcasting: The First Ten Years. It was not such a joy having to cut down the many sage and inspiring things they said to tiny soundbites, because 56 minutes of airtime are very quickly filled. So here are full-length versions of several of the interviews I did, in case you are particularly interested in podcasters talking shop.

I’d get squirrelly if I didn’t sit down and talk to people once or twice a week. I would be accosting people in the street if I wasn’t doing the podcast.


I don’t mind telling you I was really quite intimidated to speak to Marc Maron. How do you interview someone who’s done nearly 500 highly-feted interviews on his own podcast? But he was very pleasant to me, and talked candidly and reflectively about podcasting turning around his career, how it can interfere with his relationships, recreating his own garage in a film studio, and stocking up on tea and biscuits for Iggy Pop.

I don’t want to hear about rimming in the airport at 8am.


We’d all agree with Dan Savage there. The eminent sex columnist and campaigner was writing Savage Love before Google existed, so he was effectively the search engine for all sexual problems and proclivities. The column branched out into a podcast, and Dan says: “I used to think of column as most important thing and the podcast was a side-gig, but now it’s the other way round: the podcast is much more important than the column.” Dan describes the intimacy of talking right into people’s ears while they go about their business, having to be a perfect child, and never being shocked by listeners “because I figure, if it exists, someone somewhere is effing it.”

A podcast is just a stretch of time with audio in it, and you can do whatever you want within that stretch of time; so I’d like to hear people doing whatever they want within that stretch of time.


Since it began less than two years ago, Welcome To Night Vale has been a phenomenal success, and when I spoke with its creators and writers, Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, I understood why. They wanted to make a podcast that wasn’t like any other podcasts that they’d ever heard, because those already existed. Mission resoundly accomplished.

Fun fact: one of the Night Vale guys had never used Skype before we did this interview, so by forcing him to get it, I felt like one of the bad kids in the playground giving him his first cigarette. I hope I didn’t start him on a slippery slope to…I dunno, Snapchat?

Now, there are about five steps too many to get a podcast.


This was the third time I’ve interviewed Roman Mars and since we met at SXSW last year, we’ve also become real-life pals. I’d love for him to teach me everything he knows, but I suspect that’s what everyone wants from Roman. At least I can benefit from his wisdom dispensed here. He talks about the necessity of podcasters putting in the effort, his record-breaking Kickstarter campaigns having to justify spending time away from his family, the socialist principles behind the Radiotopia collective, and how 99% Invisible fans are willing to fund the show but NOT to hear Roman swear at the dead.

The whole plan was for me to support the family by being a lawyer and Jesse would make his adorable little public radio show and podcast and pay some of the bills that way. Instead now I work for the company and we’re trying to pay off my law school debt!


But thank goodness things did turn out that way for Theresa Thorn and her husband Jesse, otherwise the rest of us wouldn’t get to enjoy the fruits of the Thorns’ podcasting empire Maximum Fun. Theresa’s podcast One Bad Mother is absolutely charming, even if like me you’re not particularly interested in parenting; she tells me about oversharing, having babies to beget podcast material, and MaxFunFans bonding with each other in real life.

Did I expect to be in for an interesting ride? Yes. Am I amazed to be still on that ride? Yes.


I have a lot for which to be grateful/ungrateful to Ewan Spence, because without him I might never have become a podcaster at all. And then where would I be? (A: still working on my own in my living room most of the time.) Being interviewed by Ewan for a podcast way back in 2006 was what gave Olly the idea to start a podcast with me.
Ewan talks about how he came to be Scotland’s first podcaster, and subsequently the Edinburgh Fringe podcaster and THE Eurovision Song Contest podcaster – he’s out there backstage in Copenhagen right now!

Keith loves the fans so much, he married one!


Keith and the Girl have such hardcore fans, there are more than 130 KATG tattoos and counting – and even a few horrific-sounding (and looking) FLESH BRANDINGS. Frankly I’m relieved that Answer Me This! fans are comparatively restrained in their affections… I don’t know how Keith and Chemda manage to do a podcast DAILY – they even released an episode on the day their romantic relationship came to an end – but I’m glad they do: they’re very frank, funny and smart.

Podcasting became this opportunity to try something different, something new, see what worked.


I dragged Chris Skinner out of a post-knee-operation cloud of anaesthesia to talk about making some of Britain’s earliest podcasts, as well as The Game, the Dave Gorman podcast, and my brother’s podcast The Bugle. Speaking of which…

The internet is the 21st-century equivalent of shouting at traffic.


It was a bit weird interviewing my brother Andy, so naturally I asked him about the sibling rivalry that everybody assumes plagues us. He and his Bugle co-host John Oliver speak about relishing the complete creative freedom of podcasts, making each other laugh, and how Listeners paying for podcasts is “like higher rate taxation: voluntary, but if you’re feeling philanthropic you might want to do it.” Afterwards Andy said he and John had never actually talked to each other about most of the things I asked them about in the interview, so it was nice for him to find out why John wants to carry on doing the podcast even though he’s now Big Johnny Showbiz. (Apparently the contract for his new gig specifies that he is allowed to continue Bugling, you’ll be relieved to know.)

The whole playlist:

April 12, 2014

Podcasting: the First Ten Years

Planning the documentary the high-tech way

Planning the documentary the high-tech way

I have no recollection of how I marked my own tenth birthday, but I’ll certainly remember how I celebrated a decade since the word ‘podcast’ was born, because Olly and I made a Radio 4 documentary about it! Here is Part 1 and here is Part 2. If those links aren’t working for you, go here, but don’t say I sent you.

We spoke to lots of interesting and inspiring people to make the show, including (but not limited to):

Ben Hammersley, who invented the word although doesn’t seem too happy about it; one of my favourite podcasters, Flight Attendant Betty; the mighty Marc Maron; our former adversary Richard Herring; Theresa Thorn of the excellent One Bad Mother, and one half of the podcasting power couple behind the Maximum Fun empire; Nate Lanxon, editor of Wired.co.uk; Adam Curry, who was podcasting way before ‘podcasting’ even was named; Joseph Fink and Jeffrey Cranor, who begat the stratospherically successful Welcome To Night Vale, though it does not seemed to have turned their heads at all; Keith and the Girl, whose fans are so devoted, they cause themselves permanent flesh wounds; Roman Mars, who Kickstarted a shitload of money to fund 99% Invisible because the show is fantastic and so are podcast fans; Pete Donaldson of the refreshingly non-blokey (for a sports show) Football Ramble; and Producer Chris*, John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman (yes my brother) of The Bugle.

There were numerous more excellent contributors, so rather than take my word for it, you’d better listen instead.

*Fun fact: initially Chris missed our interview, because he was recovering from surgery and fell asleep doing a 1,500-piece jigsaw of a map of the world. I can’t be mad at that.

March 12, 2014

podclash

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A union of podcasts this week, as Olly and I were guests on Richard Herring’s Leicester Square Theatre Podcast. There’s been beef between us from a few years ago, and finally it gets a thorough chewing:

Here’s the March episode of the Sound Women podcast, featuring a very enjoyable guide to surviving a breakfast show from Natalie B of Heart Four Counties. I still don’t know how she does it. I would be permanently delirious from working those hours. I also met Eleanor McDowall who produces Radio 4’s Short Cuts, and Ruth Barnes interviews Xfm presenter Danielle Perry. It’s on iTunes, or right here:

UPDATE: there’s also a bonus episode of Sound Women this month, as I went down to Radio 1 just as they were kicking off their all-female schedule for International Women’s Day. I met Annie Mac, and Hayley Clarke spoke to B.Traits and Monki:

And here’s Answer Me This! Episode 285, featuring correspondence from an actual OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALLIST.

November 1, 2013

Sound Women podcast 7

Perhaps because even my body thinks I should shut the hell up occasionally, I lost my voice this week. This is a bit problematic when your job involves talking, and I had to cancel a couple of things; but the Sound Women podcast soldiers on, albeit with links that sound a like a creaking gate. Happily, alongside my rusty voice is the Voice of An Angel: I spoke to none other than Charlotte Church after she delivered the BBC 6 Music John Peel Lecture at the Radio Festival. It’s well worth listening to her lecture about the music industry’s sexualisation of young female artists – you can download it here.

I also caught up with Louisa Compton who is, er, my boss at Saturday Edition, as well as the formidable editor of 5 Live’s daytime content including Victoria Derbyshire, Shelagh Fogarty and Richard Bacon. And self-confessed radio anorak Andrea Day told me all about what goes into radio traffic reports: A LOT OF WORK.

Also, this week’s Answer Me This! was a bit of a novelty, as we recorded in Olly‘s new house in the country, which just happens to be close to a dinosaur-themed adventure golf course. Now I understand why he moved out of London.


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October 26, 2013

Radio Academy comedy event

A few weeks ago, I took part in a Radio Academy panel about radio comedy. They’ve just released the audio, so if you’re interested in what Jon Holmes (host of the Xfm breakfast show, regular on R4’s The Now Show), Gareth Gwynn (presenter on BBC Radio Wales, writer on myriad radio shows), Colin Anderson (producer of Radio 4 comedy, Pappy’s Bangers and Mash, International Waters), Ben Walker (producer of radio comedy and numerous podcasts including Pappy’s Flatshare Slamdown and Richard Herring’s Leicester Square Theatre Podcast) and I have to say on the subject, click here.

September 18, 2013

impending live events

Next week I shall be leaving the house TWICE to participate in live events. Yes! Assuming I can remember where the front door is.

On Wednesday 25th September, I’ll be taking part in a Radio Academy event all about making audio comedy. It’s at the Phoenix on Cavendish Square in central London and will also feature comedy writer-presenters Gareth Gwynn and Jon Holmes, and radio and podcast producers Colin Anderson and Ben Walker. For more information and tickets, CLICK HERE.

Then on Thursday 26th September, I’ll pop up in Brighton at Jo Neary and Friends at the Caroline of Brunswick on Ditchling St, a hop and a step from Brighton railway station. I’ll be presenting a slideshow about my collection of sexist, racist mid-20th century cookbooks. Of course you need to see this, especially as tickets are only £3. CLICK HERE for details of the gig.
[UPDATE: alas I can no longer do the gig. But there’s a terrific line-up so you won’t miss me at all.]

Another event I did in late August, the live recording of Jordan Jesse Go!, is now available as a podcast HERE.

September 2, 2013

Sound Women podcast 5: Jane Garvey

One of the boons of making the Sound Women podcast is that I get to interview people I think are very interesting. Before even starting the series, I had Woman’s Hour‘s Jane Garvey in the crosshairs, so I was utterly delighted to stick a microphone in her face for SWP5. Naturally she did not disappoint.

Also on the episode: Amazing Radio‘s Ruth Barnes and Rachael Devine, and head of Sound Women regions Lucy Duffield. Dose yourself with the show via iTunes and SoundCloud.

This week is the third birthday of BBC 5 Live’s Saturday Edition, on which I’m continually delighted to have a weekly gig. In its podcast form it is known as Let’s Talk About Tech, and on the 31st August episode I contemplate the Huffington Post’s decision to abolish anonymous commenter accounts, and the mother-daughter team who make over $1m scamming online daters.

I have to admit, I’ve been feeling a bit of ‘seven-year itch’ about Answer Me This! lately – but nonetheless I think the show has been on rather good form recently. It is available for your attention at answermethispodcast.com.

August 2, 2013

manifold noises

I’ve already done three podcasts this month, and it’s only 2nd August.

Episode 4 of the Sound Women podcast is out now at iTunes and SoundCloud and is bursting at the seams with interesting radio stuff.

To hash over the findings of the Women on Air report, which I posted about before, I gathered together a crack team: founder of Sound Women Maria Williams; Emma Barnett, Sunday Drive presenter on LBC and Women’s Editor at the Telegraph; and Tony Moorey, director of content at Absolute Radio. As the token man in the room, I hope Tony didn’t feel too picked on.

Ruth Barnes interviewed Caroline Barker about her career as a sports reporter on BBC 5 Live and the World Service, amongst other stations, and why Father Christmas compelled her to start her own production company.

I also spoke to Camilla Pia, playlister at BBC 6 Music. I’m always really interested to learn about what goes on behind the scenes in radio (and TV, and film, and myriad other industries), and as Camilla says, if she’s doing her job properly, the listener shouldn’t even be aware that her job exists.

Next: Matt Hill, producer of the Guardian’s Media Talk podcast, let me host a special edition of the show all about podcasting, wherein I interviewed my brother Andy! Which was weird. We don’t really talk about our podcasts much in Real Life. The show also featured producer of Hackney Podcast Francesca Panetta, Pappy’s Flatshare Slamdown and Richard Herring producer Ben Walker, Maximum Fun founder Jesse Thorn, 99% Invisible‘s Roman Mars, and some guy called Olly Mann.

Also, I should have mentioned earlier our spot on BBC 5 Live’s Saturday Edition last weekend, as we discussed Caroline Criado-Perez’s resilience in the face of vicious Twitter abuse. I went off on one about why I think it’s unwise to dismiss terrible online behaviour just as trolling; to me, ‘troll’ is a term through which one can dehumanise behaviour which is very human, unfortunate as that is.

I don’t mean that to say, “Guys, trolls are human too! Protect the trolls and their rights!” I mean: abusive, insensitive, dangerous, calculatedly offensive behaviour online is performed by actual sentient human beings, who possess the same faculties as the rest of us, and I don’t think the problem will be rectified if one loses sight of that and hides their actions under a blanket term, especially this one which sounds so childish and daft. Anyway, if you’re interested, you can download the podcast of the 27th July episode here.

On a more cheerful note, there is Answer Me This! Episode 265, where we learn about the origins of Amazon, hamburgers and straitjackets, and also why you should keep your genitals clean. I really don’t know why there’s any question about that.

PS A post I wrote last week about why I don’t like sport.

PPS My husband did a TEDx talk, which I’d better remember to watch.

July 12, 2013

Women on Air report

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As a woman who works in radio and a woman who likes listening to radio and a person who wonders why women are a comparative rarity on the radio, Sound Women is a cause dear to my heart. (Obviously, since I make their podcast.)

Today Sound Women released their Women on Air report, which found that only one in five presenters on British radio is female. The proportion is even lower when you break it down by such factors as appearing on air regularly, during weekdays, during primetime, solo, playing an equal rather than subordinate part in a presenting partnership, etc etc. NB The report was specifically researching the gender split of presenters; there is also a known insufficiency of female guests, pundits and so forth. Hence the advent of Sound Women a couple of years ago, as recounted by founder Maria Williams in the first episode of the Sound Women podcast.

To me, the one in five number in the report is disappointing, but not at all surprising. Last year I was interviewed by Persephone Magazine and mentioned that I hadn’t ever really been aware of my gender working against me professionally until I entered the radio sphere. It was impossible to ignore the imbalance within the industry. For instance, a few years ago, Olly and I arrived to make a demo at a well-known radio station and, off-hand, I asked the producer how many female presenters they had.

“Errr… Laura does the weather?”

Weather, traffic, news – that’s the female representation on too many radio stations. And yet, so many people I’ve spoken to hadn’t even noticed how few women there are on air until I pointed it out to them. This is the case also with people in radio power: the majority of high-ranking radio execs are male, which means those who could fix the gender problem are not necessarily aware of the problem, and if they are, they are not personally affected by the problem, and therefore not particularly incentivised to address the problem. Happily, in response to the report, I have heard that various radio stations are already planning various schemes to increase the female voice quotient, and I hope these do end up making a palpable difference over the next few years.

But how did it reach the point where the industry has to be harangued to better represent fifty per cent of the populace?

Amongst many radio honchos, the justification for not employing female presenters is the received wisdom that people do not like listening to women – and specifically that even women do not like listening to women.

This ‘fact’ is apparently based on a piece of research, which nobody working in radio today seems to have seen, and if it ever indeed existed it was done decades ago – back when the majority of women on radio were played by Kenny Everett.

Aside from the difficulty of access to the industry and the alleged antipathy of listeners, there’s another possible reason for the paucity of female voices: many of the people I’ve spoken to for the Sound Women podcast have suggested that, in general, women tend to be less apt than their male equivalents to promote themselves, to effect similar confidence, or to be sure that their voices ought to be heard. IE the female talent pool is self-limiting. I wonder whether this is why apparently women are also scarcer in the field of podcasting. Unlike getting into radio, there are almost no barriers to becoming a podcaster: if you want to do it, you can just go ahead and do it.

So: women, speak up. And everybody else, regardless of your gender, be prepared to listen.

July 8, 2013

Sound Women podcast: episode 3

Owing to the aforementioned holiday, I’m behind schedule posting about the latest Sound Women podcast. But it’s here! You should listen because everybody could do with more Miranda Sawyer in their lives.

To respond to listeners’ questions about the radio industry, I deployed producer Laura Parfitt, maker of many excellent radio programmes. What I admired about the advice she gave was the stringency, the perfectionism and intellectual rigour. ‘Do it, and do it properly’ is a simple message that bears repeating.

Incidentally, while I was interviewing Laura in her living room, it sounded like she was emitting low growls every couple of minutes. This really threw me, until I realised her little dog was hiding behind her in the armchair.

Also on the show: Ruth Barnes of Amazing Radio and The Other Woman podcast interviews Adele Roberts about going from Big Brother 3 to BBC 1Xtra; and Emma Jane Bradshaw reports from the final act of this year’s Sound Women mentorship scheme. I’ve been thinking that I need a mentor, but really what I need is somebody to kick me up the arse metaphorically. Any takers? Never mind.

The Sound Women podcast is available at iTunes and SoundCloud; find out more about Sound Women’s excellent work at soundwomen.co.uk.

June 1, 2013

Sound Women podcast: episode 2

Behold, here is the Sound Women podcast episode 2: Attack of the Clones featuring numerous exciting people who spoke at the recent Sound Women Festival, such as Fi Glover, Anita Anand, Angie Greaves and Jo Good. By all accounts the festival was an excellent day, but, alas, I didn’t get to go; it was my husband’s birthday, which he commemorated by walking from Rotherhithe to Crystal Palace via many of South London’s unloveliest industrial wastelands.

If you want a lovely walk through South London, though, I wholeheartedly recommend the Green Chain route. And naturally I wholeheartedly recommend subscribing to the podcast via iTunes or following it on SoundCloud.